timesawastin


wired:

There are millions of apps out there, and some of them are actually useful.
2012 was an especially busy year for developers, who churned out roughly eleventy-billion apps, including a few for Windows phones. We saw the rise and rise of Instagram, the short-lived Draw Something fad and the inauguration of presidential campaign apps.
We’ve already run down the essential apps — 413 essential apps, to be exact — and now, as the year has wound down, we run down the most memorable.
Check them out here, and tell us how much you disagree with us!

wired:

There are millions of apps out there, and some of them are actually useful.

2012 was an especially busy year for developers, who churned out roughly eleventy-billion apps, including a few for Windows phones. We saw the rise and rise of Instagram, the short-lived Draw Something fad and the inauguration of presidential campaign apps.

We’ve already run down the essential apps — 413 essential apps, to be exact — and now, as the year has wound down, we run down the most memorable.

Check them out here, and tell us how much you disagree with us!

Tagged: appstechnology

jtotheizzoe:

The Earthquake Rose
A 2001 earthquake in Olympia, WA caused a sand pendulum to draw this floral design as a result of the high- and low-frequency waves that shook the shop it resided in. Beautiful result of a destructive moment.
(via Futility Closet)


Where in Olympia is this

jtotheizzoe:

The Earthquake Rose

A 2001 earthquake in Olympia, WA caused a sand pendulum to draw this floral design as a result of the high- and low-frequency waves that shook the shop it resided in. Beautiful result of a destructive moment.

(via Futility Closet)

Where in Olympia is this

Source: futilitycloset.com

allthingseurope:

 (by . ADRIEN .)

Ahh

allthingseurope:

 (by . ADRIEN .)

Ahh

beingblog:

“It may be that you are not yourself luminous, but you are a conductor of light. Some people without possessing genius have a remarkable power of stimulating it.”
~Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles
photo by Tai Chang Hsien

beingblog:

“It may be that you are not yourself luminous, but you are a conductor of light. Some people without possessing genius have a remarkable power of stimulating it.”

~Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles

photo by Tai Chang Hsien

jtotheizzoe:

The Earthquake Rose
A 2001 earthquake in Olympia, WA caused a sand pendulum to draw this floral design as a result of the high- and low-frequency waves that shook the shop it resided in. Beautiful result of a destructive moment.
(via Futility Closet)

jtotheizzoe:

The Earthquake Rose

A 2001 earthquake in Olympia, WA caused a sand pendulum to draw this floral design as a result of the high- and low-frequency waves that shook the shop it resided in. Beautiful result of a destructive moment.

(via Futility Closet)

Source: futilitycloset.com

azizalbraik:

Simon Beck creates gigantic snow artworks using only his feet

Source: azizalbraik

Tagged: dexter

frontal-cortex:

3D imaging with Ion-Abrasion SEM
The delicate swirls of pink and gold in this image could have come from Botticelli’s brush, but there’s nothing angelic about the subject, a melanoma cell. It is seen here by an ionabrasion scanning electron microscope that uses a method of 3D imaging being developed at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. The microscope sends beams of gallium ions across an object, blasting away layers of the surface 20 nanometers at a time. By scanning each newly created surface, the microscope can compile three-dimensional images with unprecedented detail and resolution, says image creator Donald Bliss, a medical illustrator at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland. The images show almost too much detail—“It’s like looking at a bowl of spaghetti suspended in clear Jell-O,” he says—so Bliss chose to highlight some of the data. Here, he shows the nucleus as the dark sphere, engulfed by mitochondria (in pink) and endoplasmic reticulum (in gold). (nsf.gov)
Because of the unique technique, the picture got an honorable mention during Science Magazine’s 2008 International Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge.
Credit : Donald Bliss and Sriram Subramaniam, National Library of Medicine, NIH

frontal-cortex:

3D imaging with Ion-Abrasion SEM

The delicate swirls of pink and gold in this image could have come from Botticelli’s brush, but there’s nothing angelic about the subject, a melanoma cell. It is seen here by an ionabrasion scanning electron microscope that uses a method of 3D imaging being developed at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. The microscope sends beams of gallium ions across an object, blasting away layers of the surface 20 nanometers at a time. By scanning each newly created surface, the microscope can compile three-dimensional images with unprecedented detail and resolution, says image creator Donald Bliss, a medical illustrator at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland. The images show almost too much detail—“It’s like looking at a bowl of spaghetti suspended in clear Jell-O,” he says—so Bliss chose to highlight some of the data. Here, he shows the nucleus as the dark sphere, engulfed by mitochondria (in pink) and endoplasmic reticulum (in gold). (nsf.gov)

Because of the unique technique, the picture got an honorable mention during Science Magazine’s 2008 International Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge.

Credit : Donald Bliss and Sriram Subramaniam, National Library of Medicine, NIH